Dwarf Tomato Project

I like growing a variety of tomatoes, especially heirlooms which can get quite large

I like growing a variety of tomatoes plants, especially heirlooms which can get quite large; These are all from full-sized plants

Tomato Plant Lingo

Pruning, staking, pinching, tying up branches are all jobs that come with a good tomato harvest. Particularly indeterminate plants which are simply plants that continue to grow quite large and fruit continuously until frost. Determinate plants, or “bush” plants grow to a more compact height (4-6 feet high), stop growing when the fruit sets on the terminal or top bud, and ripens the entire crop at once, approximately over a 2 week period and then dies. But what if you could have a compact plant, 3 to 4 feet, that produces all season long? Intrigued when I heard about a project for developing dwarf tomato plants,  I wanted more information and seeds to try them. More space to grow more varieties? Deal me in!

Brad Gates of Wild Boar Farms with a towering heirloom tomato plant

Brad Gates of Wild Boar Farms with a towering heirloom tomato plant

I grow tomatoes in a pretty large space, 60′ x 40′, and when empty it looks like I could fit a lot of veggies in that wide open area. But once I start planting out my 12 to 15 tomato plants (sometimes more), along with squash, lettuce, beans, and other assorted cutting flowers, the space shrinks considerably and I run out of room. A fully grown caged tomato plant turns into a monster with branch tentacles that reach out of the cage in all directions so that it is hard to pass between plants. I was ready for some compact plants. And I love to try new varieties. Go to Pushing the Tomato Envelope to see some suggestions.

 A rainbow of dwarf varieties-courtesy of Craig LeHouillier

A rainbow of dwarf varieties-courtesy of Craig LeHouillier

Dwarf Tomatoes Are Here!

Thanks to the Dwarf Tomato Breeding Project, a 2006 brainstorm between Craig LeHouillier, a tomato hobbyist, and Patrina Nuske Small, an Australian gardener, citizen scientists pitched in and are working on an all-volunteer, all-amateur, open-source worldwide non-profit breeding effort. A team of everyday backyard growers from all over the world in the northern hemisphere and southern hemisphere collaborated which meant that two generations of experiments could be done in a single calendar year-thus cutting the time of development in half.

tomato

Tomatoes need pruning, tying up and supporting to help in air circulation to reduce disease

Great Taste

The goal of the project was to develop great new dwarf varieties on sturdy and compact plants with high yields and colorful fruits and of course – great taste. There are lots of space-challenged tomato lovers who would jump at the chance at growing any of these varieties as long as the taste remains the same high quality either in containers or in a garden. Described as sweet and mild, tart, smoky, rich, and even salty, the taste of the new varieties will please any tomato lovers palate.

Dwarf tomato plants in grow bags-courtesy of Craig Lehouillier

Dwarf tomato plants in grow bags-courtesy of Craig LeHouillier; Notice the crinkled or “rugose” leaves

Craig LeHouillier

Craig LeHouillier, known as Tomatoman and for his introduction to the world – the luscious Cherokee Purple tomato– and Patrina Small were the driving force behind the project of crossing colorful tasty, indeterminate heirloom tomatoes and the few available dwarf tomato varieties to produce unique hybrids. Six to ten generations were planted out to stabilize a new variety and volunteers grow these new varieties for carefully selected seed companies to distribute. The new varieties are great-tasting, open-pollinated tomatoes that require less space and are easier to take care of.

Criag LeHouillier and wife Susan-photo courtesy of Craig LeHouillier

Criag LeHouillier and wife Susan-photo courtesy of Craig LeHouillier

Craig is author of Epic Tomatoes

Craig is the author of Epic Tomatoes

Attributes

Dwarf tomatoes have crinkly dark-green leaves, termed “rugose” and grow about half of the height of an indeterminate tomato, around 3 to 4 feet.

Dwarf tomato plant showing the crinkly foliage

Dwarf tomato plant showing the crinkly foliage

There are early, mid-season, and late season fruit options so you can enjoy dwarf varieties all season long, just like in the larger heirlooms. The central stems are thicker than other tomatoes and the fruit comes in the 3 to 18 ounce range. So, these aren’t dwarf fruit! Colors range across the tomato spectrum with orange, stripes, yellow, amber, bi-colors, stripes, blacks (purple & chocolate), pink, red, white and green (when ripe) shades; A veritable rainbow! For more information about the project, go to Dwarf Tomato Project.

Rainbow colors of dwarf varieties, courtesy Craig LeHouillier

Rainbow colors of dwarf varieties, courtesy Craig LeHouillier

Sources

So where can gardeners pick these up and what kind of selection is available? According to Craig LeHouillier, “We have 60 in seed catalogs (mostly between the four companies Victory, Sample Seed Shop, Heritage Seed Market and Tatiana’s TOMATObase).  Probably another 5-6 coming out next year, and dozens in development”.

I have already ordered my seeds as it is time to start those seeds right now!

Heritage Seed Market

Sample Seed Shop

Southern Exposure Seed Exchange

Victory Seeds

Tatiana’s TOMATObase

 

About thegardendiaries

Claire Jones is a landscape and floral designer and owner of Claire Jones Landscapes, LLC. She designs and helps people to create their own personal outdoor oasis and loves to write about her gardening failures and successes.
This entry was posted in gardening, gardening how-to, Herb and Vegetable Gardening and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

14 Responses to Dwarf Tomato Project

  1. Joyce Morgan says:

    A good project for your garden club to sell the small tomato plants at May Fair. I prefer red, and would certainly purchase a plant or two.

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  2. Wow! I had no idea there were so many varieties of tomatoes. I’m always afraid to grow many because I don’t know what to do with them all. I’m not a canning person. Lots of good information and since we will have an early spring, It’s time to get going on them.

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  3. Claire Splan says:

    Hi Claire! I’m not clear on how these plants are different from determinate tomato plants?

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  4. Donna Shields says:

    It’s a small world again! Craig and his wife are acquaintance of mine. Both are super people! I’ve just been in recent contact with him re a presentation to my Herb Society, here in Raleigh, NC. I have attended several of his talks as well as , what I like to call.. his ” tomato tasting events in the past….. Always many thanks for your informative post and beautiful photos! I hope to work in the White House again.

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  5. I broke up with my tomatoes – too much drama. Now I just buy them at the Farmers Market. But these do look wonderful!

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  6. Monica says:

    Beautiful tomatoes!

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  7. Just such breathtaking variety and beauty! We’re planning our first vegetable patch this year and your dwarf tomatoes have inspired me.

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  8. bestpolesaw says:

    This post is very nice for gardening and its flowers is really awesome. If you want any gardening tools to contact with below link.
    http://www.americantreeservicesupply.com/

    Like

  9. Steve Jones says:

    Hi Thanks for posting this I found it informative and you have inspired me to grow more varieties of tomatoes this season than I was going to. This year is international year of the tomato apparently so I suppose we all should do our bit.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Pingback: Some Like It Hot-Tomatoes Do Not! | The Garden Diaries

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